Marilyn Monroe's final home where her lifeless body was found is set for DEMOLITION after iconic Hacienda-style LA bungalow was sold for $8.3million

  • Post category:news
  • Reading time:5 min(s) read

  • Marilyn Monroe’s LA home is facing demolishment from the current owner
  • The Hacienda-style home was last purchased in 2017 for a whopping $8.3 million
  • Brentwood home was where Monroe’s body was discovered in August 1962

The owners of the LA home where Marilyn Monroe lived before her death and where her body was discovered have filed to demolish the $8.35million bungalow.

The Brentwood Hacienda-style home is best known as the last residence of the ‘Some Like It Hot’ star.

According to records from the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety, the new owners of the home officially filed a plan to tear down the estate in August.

The city gave a green light for investigators to check the plan for demolishment but a formal permit has yet to be granted by officials, records show.

Monroe purchased the home in February 1962 for $77,500 – equivalent to about $790,000 today after accounting for inflation. 

Her lifeless body was discovered just six months later on August 5. The icon had died of a barbiturate overdose at just 36 years old. 

The owners of the LA home where Marilyn Monroe lived before her death and where her body was discovered have filed to demolish the $8.35 million bungalow

The owners of the LA home where Marilyn Monroe lived before her death and where her body was discovered have filed to demolish the $8.35 million bungalow

According to records from the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety, the new owners of the home officially filed a plan to tear down the estate in August

According to records from the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety, the new owners of the home officially filed a plan to tear down the estate in August 

The Brentwood Hacienda-style home, located at 12305 Fifth Helena Drive, is best known as the last residence of the 'Some Like It Hot' starlet (pictured outside a previous home in 1956)

The Brentwood Hacienda-style home, located at 12305 Fifth Helena Drive, is best known as the last residence of the ‘Some Like It Hot’ starlet (pictured outside a previous home in 1956)

Photo of the bed where actress Marilyn Monroe, was discovered dead on August 5, 1962

Photo of the bed where actress Marilyn Monroe, was discovered dead on August 5, 1962 

The most recent owners of the 2,900 square foot home first filed a request to demolish not only the home but the attached pool house and structures on July 31. 

The request was then submitted on August 7 and officially approved for a ‘plan check’ by an inspector on September 5.  

The home was last publicly on the market in 2017 and sold for $7.25 million. 

At some point in the last six years, the home once again changed ownership for an undisclosed amount – valued around $8.35 million. 

It’s unclear why the new owner is looking to tear down the home.  

The Department of Building and Safety officially signed off on a ‘plan check’ on September 5, the first stage of the demolition process. 

The home was originally built in 1929 and has four bedrooms, three bathrooms and is located on the end of a quiet cul-de-sac in the upscale Brentwood neighborhood.

It has ‘privacy, tranquility, and close proximity’ to San Vicente restaurants and shops, according to a former Zillow listing. 

‘A truly remarkable property that is steeped in Hollywood glamour,’ the listing states. 

Additionally, the home boasts beamed ceilings, terra cotta tile floors, casement windows and a large grassy yard, pool, and citrus orchard. 

An oddly fitting message on the home’s front door reads ‘Cursum Perficio,’ a Latin inscription which translates to ‘My Journey Ends Here.’

The kitchen inside the $8.35 million home once owned by Marilyn Monroe

The kitchen inside the $8.35 million home once owned by Marilyn Monroe

The home boasts beamed ceilings, terra cotta tile floors, and casement windows

The home boasts beamed ceilings, terra cotta tile floors, and casement windows

Natural light pours into one room of the 2,900 square foot property where Monroe died

Natural light pours into one room of the 2,900 square foot property where Monroe died 

Monroe purchased the home in February 1962 for $77,500

Monroe purchased the home in February 1962 for $77,500 

The property (in color) is a 2,900 square foot Hacienda-style estate built in 1929

The property (in color) is a 2,900 square foot Hacienda-style estate built in 1929 

In the backyard, the home has a large grassy yard, pool, and citrus orchard

In the backyard, the home has a large grassy yard, pool, and citrus orchard

A police officer stands in the backyard of the Brentwood home on the day of Monroe's death

A police officer stands in the backyard of the Brentwood home on the day of Monroe’s death

One Department of Building and Safety application submitted in July, however, indicated the owner is looking to remove the existing pool shell and fill it. 

It would not be the first major change to the property should the request have been approved by city officials. 

The kitchen and bathrooms have seen major renovations since Monroe’s death in 1962 and has passed through several owners’ hands. 

Immediately after her tragic overdose, half a dozen offers poured in within a day. 

After a bidding war, the Nunez family of Southern California purchased the home in 1963, along with much of the original contents of the home. 

An auction was later held in 1997 for Monroe’s personal effects. 

The home jumped in value in 2012 when it was purchased for a whopping $5.1 million just two years after it had sold for $3.8 million. 

During the most recent public sale, the property went for $7.25 million in 2017, some $350,000 over the original asking price. 

One Department of Building and Safety application submitted in July, however, indicated the owner is looking to remove the existing pool shell and fill it

One Department of Building and Safety application submitted in July, however, indicated the owner is looking to remove the existing pool shell and fill it

'Anybody who likes my house, I¿m sure I¿ll get along with,' Monroe told associate editor Richard Merryman in a Life magazine interview in 1962

‘Anybody who likes my house, I’m sure I’ll get along with,’ Monroe told associate editor Richard Merryman in a Life magazine interview in 1962 

Monroe's body is wheeled out of her Brentwood home on August 5, 1962

Monroe’s body is wheeled out of her Brentwood home on August 5, 1962

The bedroom in which Marilyn Monroe was found dead of an overdose on August 6, 1962

The bedroom in which Marilyn Monroe was found dead of an overdose on August 6, 1962

The home has been described as an ‘oasis’ and those who knew the actress said that she was proud of it and ‘exulted in it.’ 

In 1962, Monroe opened up about her home in an interview with Life magazine.

‘Anybody who likes my house, I’m sure I’ll get along with,’ she told associate editor Richard Merryman. 

After her death, Merryman wrote of Monroe’s relationship to the property: ‘She exulted in it. On a special trip to Mexico she had carefully searched in roadside stands and shops and even factories to find just the right things to put in it. The large items had not arrived – nor was she ever to see them installed.’ 




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