Shear madness! House swallowed by hedging on sale for £45,000 (and wait until you see inside!)

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A house swallowed by a mass of hedging and plants has been listed at a guide price of £45,000.

Nature has truly thrived in the garden of a property located in Merseyside as vines and weeds have wrapped around the three bedroom home.

The unruly shrubbery seems to have taken over the back of the house and completely filled the garden.

Plants have managed to climb onto the tiled roof and swamped the windows of the property described as needing ‘complete refurbishment and cleaning’. 

Swamped by shrubs: The three-bedroom house in Merseyside has a guide price of £45,000

Swamped by shrubs: The three-bedroom house in Merseyside has a guide price of £45,000

The front of the property, pictured, also has a thick layer of ivy beginning to creep up the walls

The front of the property, pictured, also has a thick layer of ivy beginning to creep up the walls

Climbing plants have managed to creep up onto the tiled roof and block out all the windows

Climbing plants have managed to creep up onto the tiled roof and block out all the windows

Even the fence has been completely immersed by a thick layer of bright green leaves. 

The front of the property appears to have boarded up windows and a thick layer of ivy can be seen beginning to creep up the wall – already covering a window.

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Neighbours reveal ‘nightmare’ of living next door to home ‘consumed’ by trees and ivy that were allowed to grow out of control for 40 YEARS

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The end-of-terrace property is described as offering ‘a lot of potential’ and a ‘refurbishment project’. 

Photographs on Rightmove show the inside of the house, with what appears to be large cobwebs in some rooms and items stacked on the floors.

Some reacted to the property posted online, one Reddit user said: ‘Next door looks like it’s in defiant reaction. ‘We’ve seen what plants can do. Having none of that.”

Another added: ‘I didn’t even notice the house covered for a good minute or so.’

Someone else said: ‘This house is definitely winning the game of hide and seek it’s playing though.’  

Another commented: ‘It’s too late. The house belongs to the spiders now.’

Someone else joked about the mass of foliage: ‘If we remove it, might we change the amount of oxygen in our atmosphere?’ 

A spokesperson for The Online Auction Company said: ‘The property is currently one of the cheapest terraced houses available on Rightmove. 

‘With so much potential, average properties are selling for between £180,000 – £200,000 in the area giving any potential buyer so much scope.’

The house, pictured immersed by plants, is described as needing 'complete refurbishment and cleaning'

The house, pictured immersed by plants, is described as needing ‘complete refurbishment and cleaning’

Photographs on Rightmove show the inside of the house, with what appears to be large cobwebs in some rooms and items stacked on the floors

Photographs on Rightmove show the inside of the house, with what appears to be large cobwebs in some rooms and items stacked on the floors 

The end-of-terrace property is described as offering 'a lot of potential' and a 'refurbishment project'

The end-of-terrace property is described as offering ‘a lot of potential’ and a ‘refurbishment project’

A similar property was also listed for sale earlier this year after trees and ivy were allowed to grow out of control for 40 years. 

The end-terraced property in King’s Norton, Birmingham, has been rendered virtually invisible after disappearing under a blanket of thick foliage over the decades.

Not even the chimney can be seen as the front garden is so overrun with plants and a mass of greenery has spread across almost the entire front of the house.

Local residents said the three-bedroom house has been a blot of the landscape for decades after the ‘nature-loving’ homeowner neglected to cut back the plants. 

MailOnline has contacted Rightmove for comment.